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Hydrocephalus Association Award

Since 1989, the Hydrocephalus Association has been awarding the Resident’s Prize. This prize is awarded each year to the most promising hydrocephalus-related research paper presented by a neurosurgical resident at the Pediatric Section meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons (AANS/CNS). This year I was lucky enough win this prestigious award with the abstract titled “CRISPR/Cas9-Based Development of progressive hydrocephaly (prh) Rat Model of Hydrocephalus.” I would like to thank the Mangano/Goto lab for making this possible, and thanks to our collaborators who helped us with this amazing research. Resident’s Prize

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Aspirin still unproven as therapy for curbing brain aneurysm growth

Cincinnati — Could an aspirin a day keep an aneurysm at bay? That was the question asked by stroke researchers in the University of Cincinnati Department of Neurosurgery. The researchers reviewed the cases of 186 patients who had unruptured intracranial (brain) aneurysms that were being monitored for growth at Mayfield Brain & Spine. They found a tiny difference between patients who took an aspirin daily and those who did not take any aspirin. Aneurysms in the group that took aspirin grew in 11.9% of patients (3 percent per year) while aneurysms in the non-aspirin group grew in 16.5% (4 percent …

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Questioning the classical flow of CSF

Data has already been adding up which clarifies the classic model of CSF flow that experts rely on, is not correct.  In almost all modern neuroscience literature, since the original work on hydrocephalus by Dr. Dandy, Dr. Blackfin, and Dr. Cushing, CSF is made by the choroid plexus.   Then CSF flows through the lateral ventricles into the foramen of Monroe, into the third ventricle, through the aqueduct of Sylvius, and into the fourth ventricle where it exits the ventricular system through the foramen of Magendie or Lushka into the cerebral subarachnoid space.  Then the CSF bathes the brain or …

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Application of emerging technologies to improve access to ischemic stroke care

Neurosurg Focus. 2017 Apr;42(4):E8. doi: 10.3171/2017.1.FOCUS16520. Application of emerging technologies to improve access to ischemic stroke care. Vuong SM, Carroll CP, Tackla RD, Jeong WJ, Ringer AJ. Abstract During the past 20 years, the traditional supportive treatment for stroke has been radically transformed by advances in catheter technologies and a cohort of prominent randomized controlled trials that unequivocally demonstrated significant improvement in stroke outcomes with timely endovascular intervention. However, substantial limitations to treatment remain, among the most important being timely access to care. Nonetheless, stroke care has continued its evolution by incorporating technological advances from various fields that can further …

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Joint Pediatric Section of the AANS/CNS

“Genetic Characterization of the progressive hydrocephaly (prh) Mouse Mutant” Shawn Vuong, June Goto, Rolf Stottmann, Kenneth Campbell, and Francesco Mangano Hydrocephalus is the most common brain malformation found at birth. Although the surgical intervention can greatly ameliorate outcomes, currently there is no medical cure for this condition. In addition, about 30% of these cases have unknown etiology. In order to identify molecular mechanisms involved in congenital hydrocephalus development, we investigated the genetic mutation responsible for progressive hydrocephaly (prh) mouse mutant, which was isolated in a previous forward genetic screening for severe neonatal onset hydrocephalus phenotype in mice. We performed a …

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Vascular Diseases of the Spinal Cord: Infarction, Hemorrhage, and Venous Congestive Myelopathy

Abstract Vascular pathologies of the spinal cord are rare and often overlooked. This article presents clinical and imaging approaches to the diagnosis and management of spinal vascular conditions most commonly encountered in clinical practice. Ischemia, infarction, hemorrhage, aneurysms, and vascular malformations of the spine and spinal cord are discussed. Pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical classification schemes, clinical presentations, imaging findings, and treatment modalities are considered. Recent advances in genetic and syndromic vascular pathologies of the spinal cord are also discussed. Clinically relevant spinal vascular anatomy is reviewed in detail. PMID: 27616317

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Mouse Model of Congenital Hydrocephalus

Congenital hydrocephalus continues to be a difficult disease to treat.  Unfortunately research which explains the exact mechanisms leading to the development of this disease is lacking, likely as a result of no robust models. In 2011, Stottmann et al, were looking to find and understand the genes involved with neurodevelopment.  In a mouse model, their lab performed a forward genetic screen using ENU to produce novel mutations with the goal of modeling human genetic defects.  During the screen, they produced a mutation which they called “progressive hydrocephalus” (prh).  At birth, these mice appear normal, but at day 14 they are visibly …

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